Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Database + GIS = Powerful Visualization

I love GIS. Here are two flat Oracle tables one describing the top values (depth to a particular formation) for all the wells in Kansas the other summarizing the amount of production by section (PLSS square mile), by year, by type (oil or gas), and by formation.

SQL> desc STRAT_WELL_TOP_22MAR2006
Name Null? Type
---------------------------------- -------- ------------------
FORMATION_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(60)
WELL_HEADER_KID NOT NULL NUMBER(10)
WELL_TOP NUMBER(8,2)
FIELD_KID NUMBER(10)
LATITUDE NUMBER(11,6)
LONGITUDE NUMBER(11,6)
GROUND_ELEVATION VARCHAR2(40)
GROUND_ELEVATION_SOURCE VARCHAR2(12)
WELL_TOP_SEALEVEL_NON_NED VARCHAR2(40)
WELL_TOP_SEALEVEL NUMBER

SQL> desc ACRES_640_PRODUCTION_FORMATION
Name Null? Type
---------------------------------------- -------- -------------
RECNMBR NOT NULL NUMBER(11)
STRAT_UNIT_KID NOT NULL NUMBER(10)
YEAR NOT NULL NUMBER(4)
PRODUCT NOT NULL VARCHAR2(1)
PRODUCTION NUMBER(12,2)
The goal is to produce a multipatch polygon between two formations colored by the cummulative amount of oil and gas production between the formaitons. Today I built a geoprocessing model to accomplish this task. Here are the steps I need to...

  1. Select records for two distinct formations,
  2. Generate event themes based on the x,y coordinates of the records in step 1,
  3. Generate two distinct TIN representations of the x,y,z values,
  4. Create a view that summarizes the production between the two formations by section and join that datasaet to a spatial layer depicting the sections,
  5. Use the extrude between process to generate a multi-patch polygon using the two tin datasets as the top and bottom surfaces clipped by the section production.
Anyway enough talk...Here is the model:













And here is the output...



The cool thing about the model is that I can rerun it based on any input query (set of formations). Build once, run everywhere.

Cheers,

Jeremy

Comments:
Contrary to popular opinion I am actually an admirer of what ESRI has done in their Model Builder technology. And what FME have done in their ETL Workbench tools.

Heh, I have a view of how this could be done via non-proprietary tools, but as this article shows: "it just works"!

Good article - well done.

Simon Greener
www.spatialdbadvisor.com
 
Thanks Simon! That is what I love about GIS and databases, the ability to get from A to B in any number of ways. I appreciate your work in the GIS + RDBMS community.

Cheers,

Jeremy
 
Hi There!

I am currently involve in a project which is supposed to integrate a GIS with an SQL system. I'm looking for any advice or resources you can give to me to handle this task. It is the first time that I am involved in such a project and I don't know how to tackle this issue and where to start and how to go about this.

If there is any advice, resource material or information you can give me, will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 
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